Topalov Wins Norway Chess 2015

norway chess 2015

From June 15 to 27, Norway was stage to one of this year’s chess highlights, the Norway Chess Tournament. They couldn’t have chosen a better pool of participants:

  • Magnus Carlsen. World Champion from Norway and number 1 in world rankings, currently holding an ELO of 2876 points.
  • Visvanathan Anand. Indian former World Champion and current runner-up. Number 2 in worldwide standings at an ELO-rating of 2804 points.
  • Fabiano Caruana. Recent Grand Prix victor and 3rd in world rankings with 2803 ELO points.
  • Hikaru Nakamura. 27 year-old American who ranks 4th in worldwide standings and is current Chess960 World Champion at an ELO of 2799 points.
  • Veselin Topalov. Current number 5 in world rankings. The Bulgarian holds an ELO of 2798 points.
  • Alexander Grischuk. Ranks 6th in international comparison. Holds an ELO of 2780.
  • Anish Giri. Ranked 8th at Gashimov Memorial in April. The 21 year-old ranks 9th in worldwide rankings ar an ELO of 2776 points.
  • Levon Aronian. Armenian with an ELO of 2776 points who currently ranks 10th in international comparison.
  • Maxime Vachier-Lagrave. Triple French Champion who was recently defeated by Yi Wei at the City of Leon Masters Tournament. Now 12th in world rankings, 2754 ELO points.
  • Jon Ludvig Hammer. Grandmaster and Norwegian born in 1990 – like Magnus Carlsen. Won the Norwegian National Championship in 2013 and ranks 75th internationally with an ELO of 2665.

*ELO-ratings from May 2015

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The competitors started with a blitz chess tournament on June 15 (3 minutes + 2 seconds, begging at 1st move), the results of which determined the starting positions of the actual tournament.

The prize money fund contained 300,000 US-Dollars, 75,000 of which were reserved for the victor. Ranks two and three were rewarded with 50,000 and 40,000.

Veselin Topalov prevailed with 6.5 out of 9 points after 9 suspenseful rounds over Vishy Anand (6 points) and won the overall tournament. Until the very last round, the two of them fought for the title. Hikaru Nakamura came off 3rd, while Magnus Carlsen, who usually isn’t satisfied with anything other than the gold medal, only ranked 5th at disastrous 3.5 points.

The livestream archive has videos of the individual rounds as well as helpful comments.

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Final Results
Name Rat Fed 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Score
1 GM Topalov, Veselin 2798 BUL *  ½  0  ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1  1st
2 GM Anand, Viswanathan 2804 IND  ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1  2nd 6
3 GM Giri, Anish 2773 NED  1 ½ * ½ ½  ½  ½ ½ 1 ½
4 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2802 USA  ½ ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½  1 ½ 1  3rd 6
5 GM Carlsen, Magnus 2876 NOR 0 0 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 1 1  0
6 GM Caruana, Fabiano 2805 ITA  ½ ½  ½ 0 1 * ½ 0 ½ ½ 4
7 GM VachierLagrave, Maxime 2723 FRA  0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * 1  ½ ½ 4
8 GM Aronian, Levon 2780 ARM  0 ½ ½  0 0 1 0 * ½ ½ 3
9 GM Grischuk, Alexander 2781 RUS  0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½  ½ ½ * 1
10 GM Hammer, Jon Ludvig 2677 NOR 0 0 ½ 0  1 ½ ½ ½  0 * 3

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Pairings and Individual Results Rounds 1 to 9
Results Round 1
Anand Viswanathan  Caruana Fabiano  ½ – ½
Carlsen Magnus  Topalov Veselin  0 – 1
 Giri Anish  Grischuk Alexander  1 – 0
 Nakamura Hikaru  Hammer Jon Ludvig  1 – 0
Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  Aronian Levon  1 – 0

 

Results Round 2
Grischuk Alexander  Aronian Levon  ½ – ½
Hammer Jon Ludvig  Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  ½ – ½
 Topalov Veselin  Nakamura Hikaru  ½ – ½
 Caruana Fabiano  Carlsen Magnus  1 – 0
Giri Anish  Anand Viswanathan  ½ – ½

 

Results Round 3
Anand Viswanathan  Grischuk Alexander  ½ – ½
Aronian Levon Hammer Jon Ludvig  ½ – ½
 Carlsen Magnus  Giri Anish  ½ – ½
 Nakamura Hikaru  Caruana Fabiano  1 – 0
Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  Topalov Veselin  0 – 1

 

Results Round 4
 Alexander Grischuk Hammer Jon Ludvig  1 – 0
 Topalov Veselin Aronian Levon  1 – 0
 Caruana Fabiano  Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  ½ – ½
 Giri Anish  Nakamura Hikaru  ½ – ½
 Anand Viswanathan  Carlsen Magnus  1 – 0

 

Results Round 5
 Aronian Levon  Caruana Fabiano  1 – 0
 Carlsen Magnus  Grischuk Alexander  1 – 0
 Hammer Jon Ludvig  Topalov Veselin  0 – 1
 Nakamura Hikaru  Anand Viswanathan  ½ – ½
 Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  Giri Anish  ½ – ½

 

Results Round 6
 Grischuk Alexander  Topalov Veselin  0 – 1
 Caruana Fabiano  Hammer Jon Ludvig  ½ – ½
 Giri Anish  Aronian Levon  ½ – ½
 Anand Viswanathan  Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  1 – 0
 Carlsen Magnus  Nakamura Hikaru ½ – ½

 

Results Round 7
Aronian Levon  Anand Viswanathan  ½ – ½
 Hammer Jon Ludvig  Giri Anish  ½ – ½
 Nakamura Hikaru  Grischuk Alexander  ½ – ½
 Topalov Veselin  Caruana Fabiano  ½ – ½
 Vachier-Lagrave Maxime  Carlsen Magnus  ½ – ½

 

Results Round 8
 Grischuk Alexander  Caruana Fabiano  ½ – ½
 Giri Anish  Topalov Veselin  1 – 0
 Anand Viswanathan  Hammer Jon Ludvig  1 – 0
 Carlsen Magnus  Aronian Levon  1 – 0
 Nakamura Hikaru  Vachier-Lagrave Maxim  ½ – ½

 

Results Round 9
 Vachier-Lagrave Maxim  Grischuk, Alexander  ½ – ½
 Aronian Levon  Nakamura Hikaru  0 – 1
 Hammer Jon Ludvig  Carlsen Magnus  1 – 0
 Topalov Veselin  Anand Viswanathan ½ – ½
 Caruana Fabiano  Giri Anish  ½ – ½

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Find official reports and summaries on the official tournament website.

CEZ Chess Trophy 2015

CEZ

From June 12 to 16 2015, Prague, the capital of Czech Republic, hosted the CEZ Chess Trophy 2015 tournament. The city is home to David Navara who has been challenging world class players in this very event for thirteen years now. This time

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he competed against the current number 9 in worldwide rankings, Wesley So. No doubt that this was going to be a tough one for the thirty year-old Czech. He has gone a little bit over board a few times before and has had to comply with bitter defeats on home turf at previous CEZ Chess Trophy tournaments. His score account from 2003 to 2014: two victories (against Viktor Korchnoi and Sergei Movsesian), two ties (against Anatoly Karpov and Boris Gelfand), and eight defeats (against Shirov, Short, Kramnik, Ivanchuk, Polgar, Svidler, Yifan, and Nakamura).

During the four scheduled matches (90 minutes/40 + 30 minutes – 30 seconds/move from 1st move) Navara had the chance to finally come off winner at the event which he hadn’t managed to do since 2011.

The chess event began with a simultaneous introduction of the players at which Wesley So impressively demonstrated his skills. Within an hour and forty minutes, the American faced twenty-two opponents, eighteen of which he effortlessly beat. Three duels ended in draws, while one match, against the event’s manager and sponsor Libor Kicmer (ELO 1992), ended in So’s defeat. The two of them were no less than 800 ELO points apart.

Navara had relatively good chances on a victory this year, as he is at a high point in his career. His ELO amounts to 2751 points at the moment and in a live rating shortly before the tournament he ranked 13th in world rankings.

However, Navara had no luck this time and a suspenseful draw in round 1 was quickly followed by a defeat in round 2. Round 3 was again an agreed on tie, which meant suspense until the very end. Navara could have turned the tides to an overall tie with a victory, but his efforts were useless. The Czech had to admit defeat and lost the competition at a final score of 3:1 to Wesley So.

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June 13. 14. 15. 16.
Names/Round Nat. 1 2 3 4 TOTAL
NAVARA CZE 1/2 0 1/2 0 1
SO USA 1/2 1 1/2 1 3

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David Navara lost 26.7 points in the ELO live rating and again fell behind on rank 27 in worldwide standings. What a setback!

Find pictures and game sheets on the official website.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

City of Leon Masters Tournament 2015

Yi Wei

Yi Wei

From June 12 to 14 2014, the Spanish city of Léon hosted the 28th edition of the Torneo Magistral de Ajedrez ciudad de Léon. This year’s sponsors managed to arrange the participation of four top-class players who turned the duels into thrilling battled on a high level:

  • The Frenchman Maxime Vachier-Lagrave who is not only triple French master, but also used to be one of the youngest grandmasters in the history of chess. He competed in the tournament for the very first time and was considered top-favorite from the beginning.
  • Ukrainian Ruslan Ponomariov who held the world championship title from 2002 to 2004 and was youngest world champion of all time. With the Ukrainian national team he won two gold medals at Olympic Games.
  • Chinese title defender Yi Wei who was announced youngst super grandmaster of all time in March 2015. The prodigy is already considered potential world champion by many.
  • Spanish player David Antón Guijarro who was second best player in all of Europe in 2013 and had to admit defeat to Yi Wei, despite the advantage of playing on home turf.

The four participants played in Knock-Out-mode according to the FIDE rapid chess rules. The tournament was carried out over each four matches with thinking time of twenty minutes plus ten seconds per move.

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Individual Results. Friday, June 12 2015
1st Round. June 12, 2015. 4 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 1 2711 GM Ponomariov Ruslan ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2723 2
2nd Round. June 12, 2015. 5 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name Elo Nr.
1 2 2723 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime ½ – ½ GM Ponomariov Ruslan 2711 1
3rd Round. June 12, 2015. 6 p.m.
Br. Nr. Elo Name Ergebnis Name Elo Nr.
1 1 2711 GM Ponomariov Ruslan 0 – 1 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2723 2
4th Round. June 12, 2015. 7 p.m.
Br. Nr. Elo Name Ergebnis Name Elo Nr.
1 2 2723 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime ½ – ½ GM Ponomariov Ruslan 2711 1

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Ruslan Ponomariov and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave were equally strong opponents, the decisive pinch of luck though was on the Frenchman’s side who decided the match to his favor. Ponomariov had lost quite a number of chess pieces which helped Lagrave qualify for the final round on Sunday.

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Individual Results. Saturday, June 13 2015
1st Round. June 13, 2015. 4 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 1 2626 GM Anton Guijarro David 0 – 1 GM Wei Yi 2721 2
2nd Round. June 13, 2015. 5 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 2 2721 GM Wei Yi ½ – ½ GM Anton Guijarro David 2626 1
3rd Round. June 13, 2015. 6 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 1 2626 GM Anton Guijarro David ½ – ½ GM Wei Yi 2721 2
4th Round. June 13, 2015. 7 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 2 2721 GM Wei Yi ½ – ½ GM Anton Guijarro David 2626 1

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During his very first duel, title defender Wi Yei demonstrated Spanish player Guijarro his worthiness of holding the title and scored his first victory. The following three rounds, all ended in draws, helped him maintain the advantage which made Yei opponent to top-favorite Lagrave in Sunday’s final duel.

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Individual Results. Sunday, June 14 2015
1st Round. June 14, 2015. 4 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 1 2721 GM Wei Yi ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2723 2
2nd Round. June 14, 2015. 5 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 2 2723 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime ½ – ½ GM Wei Yi 2721 1
3rd Round. June 14, 2015. 6 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 1 2721 GM Wei Yi 1- 0 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2723 2
4th Round. June 14, 2015. 7 p.m.
Br. No. ELO Name Result Name ELO No.
1 2 2723 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime ½ – ½ GM Wei Yi 2721 1

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With to his victory in third round the sixteen year old Wei Yi forced Lagrave to give up after 41 moves. Wei thus took home the title a second time in a row.

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written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

French Top 12 Club Championship 2015

French Team Championship

This year’s edition of the French Top 12 Club Championship “Championat de France d’eches interclubs Top 12“ were scheduled to take place in the Southern French city Le Grau-du-Roi (close to Montpellier) from May 30 to June 9, 2015. The tournament was fought out between the country’s twelve best teams at the local yacht club’s casino. Eight boards were stage to the chess duels which were arranged in everybody-against-everybody playing mode. Final results were only determined by those matches with definite outcomes.

Anish Giri, Arkadij Naiditsch (both Team Bischwiller), Wesley So and Dmitry Jakovenko (both Team Clichy) as well as David Navara and Radoslav Wojtszek (both Team Mulhouse) are only a few of the attending international top stars next to the best French players.

After Round 10, the final winner was already determined by Bischwiller’s 2:1 victory over Strasbourg (winning points Giri and Edouard), while the bronze and silver medals were also secured prematurely. Unfortunate was not only the Team Poitier-Migne but also Arkadij Naiditsch who was so many points short at the event that we won’t even be able to find him amongst the players with ELO-ratings of 2700 points and above.

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Final Results After 11 Rounds
Rank Team Pts j. d. p. c.
1 Bischwiller 33 11 31 41 10
2 Clichy 31 11 33 44 11
3 Bois-Colombes 28 11 22 36 14
4 Strasbourg 25 11 5 20 15
5 Evry Grand Roque 24 11 -2 24 26
6 Mulhouse Philidor 23 11 11 31 20
7 Montpellier 21 11 -7 23 30
8 Chalons-En-Champagne 20 11 -2 23 25
9 Vandoeuvre 17 11 -12 19 31
10 Grasse 16 11 -16 13 29
11 Metz Fischer 15 11 -15 17 32
12 Poitiers-Migne 11 11 -48 7 55

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Individual Results Rounds 1 Through 11
Round 1
Vandoeuvre 3 1 Grasse
Bischwiller 6 1 Metz Fischer
Chalons-En-Champagne 4 3 Montpellier
Poitiers-Migne 2 4 Strasbourg
Clichy 3 0 Bois-Colombes
Evry Grand Roque 4 2 Mulhouse Philidor
Round 2
Grasse 0 4 Mulhouse Philidor
Bois-Colombes 5 0 Evry Grand Roque
Strasbourg 2 3 Clichy
Montpellier 3 2 Poitiers-Migne
Metz Fischer 1 2 Chalons-En-Champagne
Vandoeuvre 2 4 Bischwiller
Round 3
Bischwiller 4 1 Grasse
Chalons-En-Champagne 2 2 Vandoeuvre
Poitiers-Migne 1 3 Metz Fischer
Clichy 5 0 Montpellier
Evry Grand Roque 1 2 Strasbourg
Mulhouse Philidor 3 3 Bois-Colombes
Round 4
Grasse 0 4 Bois-Colombes
Strasbourg 1 1 Mulhouse Philidor
Montpellier 2 3 Evry Grand Roque
Metz Fischer 0 5 Clichy
Vandoeuvre 4 0 Poitiers-Migne
Bischwiller 3 2 Chalons-En-Champagne
Round 5
Chalons-En-Champagne 2 0 Grasse
Poitiers-Migne 0 6 Bischwiller
Clichy 4 1 Vandoeuvre
Evry Grand Roque 2 1 Metz Fischer
Mulhouse Philidor 2 3 Montpellier
Bois-Colombes 3 1 Strasbourg
Round 6
Grasse 0 1 Strasbourg
Montpellier 1 4 Bois-Colombes
Metz Fischer 2 3 Mulhouse Philidor
Vandoeuvre 2 3 Evry Grand Roque
Bischwiller 2 1 Clichy
Chalons-En-Champagne 5 1 Poitiers-Migne
Round 7
Poitiers-Migne 0 4 Grasse
Clichy 3 2 Chalons-En-Champagne
Evry Grand Roque 0 5 Bischwiller
Mulhouse Philidor 3 0 Vandoeuvre
Bois-Colombes 3 1 Metz Fischer
Strasbourg 2 1 Montpellier
Round 8
Grasse 2 3 Montpellier
Metz Fischer 1 1 Strasbourg
Vandoeuvre 0 4 Bois-Colombes
Bischwiller 2 1 Mulhouse Philidor
Chalons-En-Champagne 2 3 Evry Grand Roque
Poitiers-Migne 0 8 Clichy
Round 9
Clichy 5 1 Grasse
Evry Grand Roque 6 0 Poitiers-Migne
Mulhouse Philidor 4 1 Chalons-En-Champagne
Bois-Colombes 1 4 Bischwiller
Strasbourg 3 1 Vandoeuvre
Montpellier 3 2 Metz Fischer
Round 10
Grasse 3 2 Metz Fischer
Vandoeuvre 1 4 Montpellier
Bischwiller 2 1 Strasbourg
Chalons-En-Champagne 1 3 Bois-Colombes
Poitiers-Migne 1 6 Mulhouse Philidor
Clichy 4 1 Evry Grand Roque
Round 11
Evry Grand Roque 1 1 Grasse
Mulhouse Philidor 2 3 Clichy
Bois-Colombes 6 0 Poitiers-Migne
Strasbourg 2 0 Chalons-En-Champagne
Montpellier 0 3 Bischwiller
Metz Fischer 3 3 Vandoeuvre

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Find further information and pictures of the event on the official tournament website.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

 

Frequeny of Fraud in Chess Increases

The recent scandal at the Women’s European Chess Championship yet again stirs the question for suitable measures to prevent fraud.

The number of cheaters caught at small and big chess tournaments around the globe has increased over the last years. This is no surprise, as chess programs are faster and better than ever and new technology tempts with new ways of cheating. Tournament participants have access to smartphones, tablets, headsets, or a partner in crime who has endless options to analyze live stream matches and to forward the information to the player. Vague security measures, high prize money incentives, and a reputation in the chess community allure amateurs and professionals to drop the idea of fair play and make use of illegal help instead. Computer analysis is to chess players what doping is to other sport professionals.

The chances of being caught cheating are very low. Though frauds are caught frequently, it seems to be only those who cheat obviously. The Georgian grandmaster Nigalidze, who quickly became target of his Armenian opponent’s suspicion at the 6th round of Dubai Open in April, used the same bathroom stall before every major move. After the referee had been informed about the suspicion, he found (hidden in a roll of toilet paper) a smartphone in the very stall Nigalidze had been using. Although denying made no sense at this point (Nigalidze was logged in to his social media account and a chess application of the current match was running), the fraud unsuccessfully tried to deny being the owner of the phone. Previous successes of his, such as the Georgian championship titles from 2013 and 2014 and a surprise victory at a tournament in Al-Ain, are now being questioned.

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Nigalidze

Nigalidze’s Case

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Particularly bold and obvious attempts to cheat with the help of technology were already documented in 1993. Back then, an unknown player with the name John von Neumann (Austrian mathematician) signed up for participation at the World Cup and managed to make his way to finals through signals in his pants. He acted so suspiciously that he was searched for prohibited items. During a following interrogation it turned out that the player wasn’t even familiar with the basic rules of chess.

In 1998, a German chess player caused a stir when performing far better than his usual ELO would suggest, made reconstructible moves with Fritz and even predicted the way his opponent would be checkmated in eight moves which by far exceeds the capacity of the human brain. As it turned out he was wearing mini earbuds, hidden by his long hair, through which the moves were transmitted to him.

Earbuds, Bluetooth-sets, alleged hearing aids, long hair, hats, caps, phones in pockets and taped to legs, text messages to partners in crime, pounding signals. So many attempts to cheat were discovered during the last years and have caused skepticism and mistrust amongst chess players.

If a tournament participant performs extraordinarily and unexpectedly well, he becomes subject to questioning. Such good performance is usually followed by accusations, strong players even face general suspicion. And even if no illegal means of help are found, the bitter taste stays and the performance is not honored by competitors.

The FIDE and tournament organizers haven’t come up with serious consequences. Though tournaments are always broadcasted live with a fifteen minute delay to interfere with analyses and tips from third parties, and bags as well as phones can be searched by referees when acute suspicion arises, many options of fraud are still accessible. Bathrooms and smoking areas are no subjects to controls, players are allowed to leave the board at any time and as often as they desire, without witnessing escort. As long as chess players have access to means of fraud, the sport will not be free of scams. The skepticism amongst players will continue to grow and the reputation of the sport will suffer severe damage.

This is the time to introduce observational measures and rules that are in line with the technical standard of today, train referees to recognize indicators, and to make chess a fair sport again to maintain an integer image in public. Whether associations and organizers will finally see the necessity to counteract fraud and when they step in, remains speculation at this point.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Natalia Zhukova is European Chess Champion 2015

NataliaZhukova

Winner Natalia Zhukova

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From May 19 to 30 2015 the 16th European Women`s Chess Championship was carried out. 98 participants, 9 of which grandmasters, from 19 countries attended the event. Georgia was represented by 28 players, better than any other participating nation, followed by Russia (17) and Azerbaijan (13). The average ELO-rating amounted to 2255 points.

After 11 rounds and a little agitation (see paragraph below), Natalia Zhukova (UKR) who had been first female European Champion in 2000 was announced winner. Nino Batsiashvili (GEO) who currently ranks 17th in worldwide rankings of active female players took home the silver medal.

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Top 20 Final Rankings

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Rk. Name Rtg FED Pts.
1 GM Zhukova Natalia 2456 UKR 9,5
2 IM Batsiashvili Nino 2473 GEO 9
3 IM Kashlinskaya Alina 2423 RUS 8
4 GM Danielian Elina 2458 ARM 7,5
5 IM Guseva Marina 2391 RUS 7,5
6 WGM Girya Olga 2479 RUS 7,5
7 GM Socko Monika 2467 POL 7,5
8 IM Melia Salome 2452 GEO 7,5
9 IM Gaponenko Inna 2391 UKR 7,5
10 IM Kovalevskaya Ekaterina 2450 RUS 7
11 IM Bodnaruk Anastasia 2402 RUS 7
12 GM Khotenashvili Bela 2527 GEO 7
13 IM Galliamova Alisa 2478 RUS 7
14 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra 2474 RUS 7
15 IM Paehtz Elisabeth 2473 GER 7
16 WGM Charochkina Daria 2391 RUS 7
17 IM Mkrtchian Lilit 2459 ARM 7
18 IM Savina Anastasia 2417 RUS 6,5
19 GM Hoang Thanh Trang 2472 HUN 6,5
20 IM Guramishvili Sopiko 2370 GEO 6,5

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Rumanian player Mihaela Sandu (ELO 2300) caused a stir at the tournament. Unexpectedly, she won the first five matches and lost the sixth, after the live stream had disconnected at her board. Thus, she fell from grace with the other participants who accused her of cheating. The accusations were firmly rejected plavix dosage by those who organized the event but seemed to be supported by the outcome of the following rounds. Due to protesting participants the live stream was delayed from cialis dosage the 8th round forward. In rounds 8,9,10, and 11 viagra online the Rumanian player was constantly inferior to her opponents, lost all matches and held an unaltered account of 6 points. Sandu was indignant with the damage of her reputation. Whether she was on the best way to score big as an underdog, her performance weakened because of the psychological pressure imposed by her opponents, or she actually cheated could not be clarified. In every way, this incident is not contributing to Sandu’s integrity.

Find individual round results at:

http://chess-results.com/tnr164130.aspx?lan=1&art=0&turdet=YES&flag=30&wi=984.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe