Wei Yi: Youngest Grandmaster of all Time

The Chinese chess grandmaster Wei Yi is currently considered the first serious future challenge for Magnus Carlsen. For two reasons: He was born June 2, 1999 and is therefore only fifteen years old at the moment. Since March 2015, he has ranged above the mark of 2700 ELO points and became the youngest Super-Grandmaster of all time – and took over the first of Carlsen’s records.

Wie Yi

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Wei Yi’s development is a rocket-like ascend

At the young age of eight, the boy participated at the Chinese Chess Championship (Group B) and as a total newcomer scored a draw against Grandmaster Zhou Jianchao.

Wei won the 2010 Asian Youth Championship in the category Under 12 and shortly after the Youth World Championship. He was rewarded with the FIDE Master title thereafter.

He fulfilled the IM norm in 2012 at the Aeroflot Open in Moscow and at the Asian Individual Championship in Ho-Chi-Minh City. The victory over Richard Rapport and a draw against winner Alexander Ipatov helped him reach the first GM norm at the Youth World Championship in Athens. For this tournament only participants under twenty years old were admitted, Wei Yi was only twelve at that time. A few months later, he fulfilled the second GM norm at the 2nd INA Open in Jakarta, at which he prevailed over Michael Krasenkow and Sergey Fedorchuk.

In January 2013, Wei Yi became International Master.

In March, he competed at the Reykjavik Open, defeated Maxime Vachier-Lagrave and thus fulfilled the third GM norm. His performance at the Chess World Cup in Tromsö was remarkable as well – with victories over favorite players Ian Nepomniachtchi and Alexey Shirov he made if two third round, which is when he lost to Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.

He was announced Grandmaster in May 2013. At the age of fourteen and about five months, Wei held an astonishing ELO of 2602 points and thus became youngest player in history who surpassed a rating of 2600 points.

The story of success continued when Wei Yi helped the Chinese national chess team to win the gold medal at the Chess Olympics in Tromsö in August 2014, and when Group B dominated with 10.5 points out of 13 duels at the Tata Steel Chess Tournament in Vijk aan Zee the following January. Without a single defeat on his account, he achieved a better ELO-rating (2804) and David Navara and qualified for joining Group A of the same tournament in the 2016 edition at which only the world’s best players compete.

In February 2015, he achieved a shared 3rd to 11th rank at the Tradewise Gibraltar Masters and improved his rating to 2706 points. He rapidly advanced to rank 40 of the worldwide standings. In March, his rating of 2706 points was officially approved, which makes him the youngest player since implementation of the ELO rating system who holds an ELO of 2700 and above.

We dedicated an article to the question of whether China is becoming the world’s new chess nation and Wei Yi will grow to become the next Magnus Carlsen. Only three months later, the question is now more discussed than ever before. There is potential in the enthusiastic Wei Yi, without doubt. What the future holds for him depends on how he uses and utilizes his talent. Magnus Carlsen, for sure, should get ready.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Surprise Winners at Reykjavik Open 2015

L'ami

Erwin L’ami

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From March 10 to 18 2015, the traditional chess tournament Reykjavik Open was staged for the 51st time by the Icelandic capital.

Among the 274 participants from 37 countries were 35 international grandmasters, elevating the event to world-class level.

93 of these participants originated from Iceland, 36 came from Norway, 15 were Germany, each 13 from the United States and Denmark, and another 10 from Canada and France travelled to Iceland to make sure that their countries were well-represented at the tournament.

The upper thirty ranks of the worldwide standings were embodied only by Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, David Navara, and Pavel Eljanov.

Dutchman Erwin L’ami who was not considered a favorite player with an ELO of 2605 points, delivered and excellent performance. Even the last critics were convinced in Round 7 when he defeated Mamedyarov (ELO 3756). He managed to remain completely undefeated until the final round – only then he lost to Eljanov. Nevertheless, he won the overall tournament: with 8.5 out of 10 points, he secured first rank which was absolutely deserved after an ELO-performance of incredible 2826 points.

Brazilian player Alexandr Fier surprised as well, ranking 4th after beating Navara in Round 8. The Frenchman and bronze-medal-winner Fabien Libiszewski performed high above his usual gaming level with an extra 200 ELO points.

The first ten ranks were rewarded with prize money ranging from €350 (10th) to €5.000 (1st).

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Final Results Top 30
Rk.   Name FED Pts.
1 GM L’ami Erwin NED 8,5
2 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 8
3 GM Libiszewski Fabien FRA 8
4 GM Fier Alexandr BRA 7,5
5 GM Naroditsky Daniel USA 7,5
6 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 7,5
7 GM Melkumyan Hrant ARM 7,5
8 GM Hansen Eric CAN 7,5
9 GM Hammer Jon Ludvig NOR 7,5
10 GM Gupta Abhijeet IND 7,5
11 GM Stefansson Hannes ISL 7,5
12 GM Danielsen Henrik ISL 7,5
13 GM Jussupow Artur GER 7,5
14 GM Grandelius Nils SWE 7,5
15 GM Gao Rui CHN 7
16 GM Granda Zuniga Julio E PER 7
17 GM Gretarsson Hjorvar Steinn ISL 7
18 GM Jones Gawain C B ENG 7
19 GM Maze Sebastien FRA 7
20 IM Norowitz Yaacov USA 7
21 GM Grover Sahaj IND 7
22 GM Idani Pouya IRI 7
23 WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 7
24 GM Cornette Matthieu FRA 7
25 GM Le Roux Jean-Pierre FRA 7
26 GM Rombaldoni Axel ITA 7
27 GM Movsesian Sergei ARM 7
28 IM Sarkar Justin USA 7
29 FM Antal Tibor Kende HUN 7
30 FM Rosner Jonas GER 7

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The ELO-rating is only a guideline and has only limited validity in determining a player’s strength – which the Reykjavik Open proved yet again.

While David Navara with an ELO of 2736 points didn’t even make it to the Top 30, other players like Johaneson (ELO 2212), Antal (ELO 2317), Khadermalsharieh (ELO 2357), or Sarkar (ELO 2376) surpassed him in means of playing performance.

The youngest participant was American Hans Niemann who came off 80th at an incredibly young age of eleven.

Find pictures, videos, and game sheets on the official website

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Veselin Topalov: World Class for a Quarter of a Century

Veselin-Topalov

The Bulgarian chess grandmaster Veselin Topalov (or in Cyrillic Веселин Топалов) celebrates his birthday today. It is not just any birthday – it is his 40th! Round lots seem to play a special role in his life anyway. At the exact age of 30, 10 years back, Topalov was crowned chess world champion. The best reason for us to have a closer look at the life of the superstar who has constantly stayed at the world’s top in matters of chess.

. Veselin Topalov was born Son of an economist and doctor on March 15 1975 in Russe, Bulgaria.

. In 1982, at the age of seven, he learned to play chess. Owed to his quick and remarkable development, he began his chess career early.

. Topalov won the U14 World Championship in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico in 1989.

. He was announced grandmaster in 1992.

. In 1993 he ranked 11th in worldwide standings and has remained at the world’s top ever since.

. 1994 was the year Topalov achieved the best ELO-performance at the Chess Olympics that he competed at with the Bulgarian national team.

. He had his longest sequence of successes in 1996 when he won in Madrid (1.-2.), Amsterdam (1.-2.) León (1.-2.), Novgorod (1.), Vienna (1.-3.), and Dos Hermanas (1.-3.).

. Topalov competed at the Chess Olympics with the Bulgarian national Team again in 1998 and 2000 and achieved the second best ELO-performance of all participants.

. Furthermore, he represented Bulgaria at the European Team Chess Championship in 1999 at which he delivered the best ELO-performance of all participants.

. The same year he participated at the European Club Cup as a member of the ŠK Bosna Sarajevo that won the tournament.

. At the international traditional tournament in Vijk aan Zee in 1999 Topalov played against Kasparov which is one of the most commented duel in the history of chess (he lost, unfortunately).

. In 2002 he made it all the way to the final duel at the Braingames Candidates’ Tournament which he lost to Peter Leko in the end.

. Topalov prevailed over World Champion Vladimir Kramnik at Vijk aan Zee in 2005 and thus ranked 3rd.

. With Kasparov, whom he defeated in the last round, he won the Tournament of Linares and also secured gold at the M-Tel Masters in Sofia one point ahead of Visvanathan Anand.

. Veselin Topalov won the 2005 edition of the double-rounded FIDE World Championship tournament at the Argentinian city San Luis prematurely. One round prior to the last he secured the victory and should have become first single World Champion in history. As the classical World Champion Kramnik was not present, the title remained divided.

. In 2005 topalov was awarded with the Chess Oscar.

. The year after he won a shared first rank with Visvanathan Anand at thr world-class tournament Corus Vijk aan Zee.

. In addition, he prevailed over European Champion Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu and repeatedly won the M-Tel Masters in Sofia.

. Topalov and Kramnik faced each other for the battle for the title in 2006. The question of who would be the single World Champion was finally to be answered. After the two were even in score and had drawn in the last round, Kramnik was able to decide the rapid chess tiebreaks in his favor – and thus became Chess World Champion.

. In 2007 Topalov, Aronian, and Radjabov won the Grandmaster Tournament in Vijk aan Zee. Another victory followed at the Spanish tournament of Category 19 the same year.

. He won the Bilbao Final Chess Masters and the Pearl Spring Tournament in Nanjing in 2008. With the Bulgarian national team he also achieved the third best result at the Chess Olympics.

. Topalov won the 2009 edition of the Candidates‘ Final in Sofia prematurely which qualified him to compete for the World Championship title.

. In 2010 he competed against World Champion Visvanathan Anand at the World Championship duel in Sofia, which he lost with a one point disadvantage. In April that year his ELO rated 2816.9 points and is therefore the seventh highest rating ever achieved.

. At the Candidates’ Tournament 2011 for the World Championship 2012 Topalov made it to quarter finals, but then dropped out after a defeat through Kamsky.

. Topalov achieved the best result at third board of all European Club Cup participants (as a member of SOCAR Baku).

. At the FIDE Grand Prix 2012/13 he secured ahead of Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Fabiano Caruana the overall victory and qualified for the Candidates’ Tournament 2014.

. He also represented Bulgaria at the European Team Chess Championship 2013 and achieved the best result at third board.

. In 2014 he, unfortunately, he ended up in bottom rank with 6 out of 14 points at the Candidates’ Tournament. At the Chess Olympics, however, he achieved the best result at first board as a member of the Bulgarian national team. He also won the European Club Cup with SOCAR Baku and achieved the best result at second board. He ranked 3rd (behind Carlsen and Caruana) at the Sinquefield Cup the same year.

. The year 2015 had a good start for him at stake: In February he ranked 5th with a 2747 ELO-performance at the Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival.

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After several successful decades of chess Topalov is currently 4th in worldwide standings at 2798 ELO points behind Carlsen, Caruana, and Nakamura.

All the best, Veselin! To a successful year!

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

 

Russia Determines Pace at European Championship

Europameisterschaften2015

From February 24 to March 9 2015 Jerusalem in Israel was stage to the European Individual Chess Championship 2015. 250 participants from 33 countries joined in – 101 players from Israel, 42 from Russia, 13 from the Ukraine, and 9 from both Armenia and Turkey. 113 Grandmasters were amongst them and promised a suspenseful event.

The competition was carried out in Swiss Tournament System and the prize money fund contained 120,000 Euros.

The Top 10 certainly tended towards Eastern Europe – Four Ukrainian and three Russian players led the field, barely leaving room for Czech player David Navara (silver medal), the Polish Mateusz Bartel (bronze meda) and Turk Alexander Ipatov (7th rank).

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Final ranks Top 30
Rk. Name FED Pts.
1 GM Najer Evgeniy RUS 8,5
2 GM Navara David CZE 8
3 GM Bartel Mateusz POL 8
4 GM Khismatullin Denis RUS 8
5 GM Vovk Yuri UKR 7,5
6 GM Korobov Anton UKR 7,5
7 GM Ipatov Alexander TUR 7,5
8 GM Eljanov Pavel UKR 7,5
9 GM Volokitin Andrei UKR 7,5
10 GM Matlakov Maxim RUS 7,5
11 GM Sjugirov Sanan RUS 7,5
12 GM Moiseenko Alexander UKR 7,5
13 GM Motylev Alexander RUS 7,5
14 Iljiushenok Ilia RUS 7,5
15 GM Kempinski Robert POL 7,5
16 GM Smirin Ilia ISR 7,5
17 GM Cheparinov Ivan BUL 7,5
18 GM Sargissian Gabriel ARM 7,5
19 GM Popov Ivan RUS 7,5
20 GM Laznicka Viktor CZE 7,5
21 GM Rodshtein Maxim ISR 7,5
22 GM Brkic Ante CRO 7,5
23 GM Nisipeanu Liviu-Dieter GER 7,5
24 GM Grachev Boris RUS 7,5
25 GM Nabaty Tamir ISR 7,5
26 GM Can Emre TUR 7,5
27 GM Nepomniachtchi Ian RUS 7
28 GM Goganov Aleksey RUS 7
29 GM Bukavshin Ivan RUS 7
30 GM Vitiugov Nikita RUS 7

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Three out of five participants ranging at 2700+ points, such as Etienne Bacrot (32nd rank), Ian Nepomniachtchi (27th rank) and Nikita Vitiugov (30th rank) surprisingly missed the Top 20 ranking. 23 year-old Russian Ilia Ilijushenok with an ELO-performance of 2680 points, on the other hand, scored a whole 230 points higher than his usual level and made a deserved 14th rank. Just as well performed Yuri Vovk (ELO 2588, Performance 2730) and Alexander Ipatov (ELO 2592, Performance 2719).

Almost half of all Top 30 players, twelve to be exact, were Russian participants. German player Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu came off 23rd.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

The World’s 20 Best Chess Players

magnus carlsenThe official FIDE world rankings have already undergone significant changes this year.

While Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana persistently hold out on first and second rank, Hikaru Nakamura has leaped forward due to his recent successes like the third rank at the Zurich Chess Challenge. Certainly worth recognition when considering that he only barely stayed in the Top 10 in the January rakings (9th). His predecessor as the world’s third, Alexander Grischuk, was expelled to 5th place from which he ousted Visvanathan Anand. The vice World Champion now has to comply with 6th rank.

Cursed by his fate is Radoslav Voitaszek who fell back five ranks since the beginning of the year and brings up the rear now. Peter Svidler, Nikita Vitiugov, and Dmitry Andreikin have even completely vanished from the Top 20.

David Navara, Liren Ding, and Evgeny Tomashevsky, on the other hand, have reason to celebrate. The three of them have just arrived in the world’s Top 20! Tomashevsky gained a remarkable 29 ELO-points this year, after he had proved his abilities at the 3rd Grand Prix tournament last week. The Chinese number one, Liren Ding, advanced from 22nd to 19th rank in January and made it to 15th rank now that he performed well at the Tata Steel Tournament. David Navara is literally rocking the ongoing European Championship and has already prevailed over Rui, Parligras, Shimanov, Potkin, and Kempinsky. Not a bad count after eight rounds. It remains to be seen how the final results of this championship and the Reykjavik Open in mid-March affect merry go-round of the world’s Top 20.

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Current Ranking

Rank

Name

Title

Country

Rating

Change

B-Year

1

Magnus Carlsen

G

NOR

2863

1990

2

Fabiano Caruana

G

ITA

2802

1992

3

Hikaru Nakamura

G

USA

2798

↑ (9)

1987

4

Veselin Topalov

G

BUL

2798

1975

5

Alexander Grischuk

G

RUS

2794

↓ (3)

1983

6

Viswanathan Anand

G

IND

2791

↓ (5)

1969

7

Anish Giri

G

NED

2790

1994

8

Wesley So

G

PHI

2788

↑ (10)

1993

9

Vladimir  Kramnik

G

RUS

2783

↓ (8)

1975

10

Levon Aronian

G

ARM

2770

↓ (6)

1982

11

Maxime Vachier-Lagrave

G

FRA

2765

1990

12

Sergey Karjakin

G

RUS

2757

1990

13

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov

G

AZE

2756

1985

14

David Navara

G

CZR

2750

↑ (23)

1985

15

Ding Liren

G

CHN

2749

↑ (22)

1992

16

Boris Gelfand

G

ISR

2747

↓ (14)

1968

17

Evgeny  Tomashevsky

G

RUS

2745

↑ (31)

1987

18

Michael Adams

G

ENG

2745

1971

19

Dmitry Jakovenko

G

RUS

2742

↑ (20)

1983

20

Radoslaw Wojtaszek

G

POL

2738

↓ (15)

1987

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Tomashevsky wins 3rd Grand Prix Tournament

grand prix tbilisi

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From February 14 through 18 2015, the Georgian capital Tbilisi hosted the third event of the new FIDE Grand Prix Series. The World Championship cycle 2014/2015 consists of four tournaments – which is certainly an extraordinary setting, as usually six tournaments took place during one Grand Prix Series. The FIDE has not pointed out any reasons for this derivative in particular, but people speculate that not enough applications for hosting the tournaments have been submitted. There is a prize money fund of 120,000 Euro per tournament, 20,000 Euro of which go to the winner. Both winner and runner-up secure the right to participate in the Candidates’ Tournament.

Sixteen players compete in the tournament series. The rules suggest that each player participates in three of the four events. The competing players in Tbilisi were: Alexander Grischuk, Anish Giri, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Peter Svidler, Dmitry Andreikin, Dmitry Jakovenko, Teimour Radjabov, Leinier Dominguez Perez, Evgeny Tomashevsky, Baadur Jobava, and Rustam Kasimdzhanov. The ELO therefore ranged between 2696 (Jobava) and 2810 (Grischuk).

The FIDE’s timing was subject to criticism, as the 1st Grand Prix Tournament ended only five days prior to the beginning of the next. Not exactly a walk in the park for the players who attended the first and second event (Caruana, Gelfand, Karjakin, Nakamura, Radjabov, Mamedyarov, Kasimdzhanov, and Andreikin). The three months break in between the second and third events gave the players time for thorough preparation.

Especially Tomashevsky seemed to have used this time well – against all expectations he played a successful tournament and took home the trophy. He remained undefeated throughout all eleven duels and prevailed not only over favorite Grischuk in Round 3, but also over Jobava, Mamedyarov, Vachier-Lagrave, and Kasimdzhanov. A total of five victories and eight points on the tournament account gave him an impressive advantage. He even left behind runner-up Jakovenko (two victories, 6.5 points) far behind. A surprising but well-deserved victory for the 27 year-old Russian.

The disappointing bottom rank took Andreikin, the winner of the generic propecia 2nd Grand Prix tournament, who only scored four points with no victories and three defeats.

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Final Results
Rank SNo. Name Rtg FED Pts
1 6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 RUS 8
2 8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 RUS
3 12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 AZE 6
4 4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 UZB
5 1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 CUB
6 11 GM Giri Anish 2797 NED
7 10 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 AZE
8 9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 RUS 5
9 3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 FRA 5
10 7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 GEO 5
11 2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 RUS
12 5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 RUS 4

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Pairings & Round Results

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Round 1 on 2015/02/15 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 0 – 1 GM Giri Anish 2797 11
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 0 – 1 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 0 – 1 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 ½ – ½ GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 1 – 0 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
Round 2 on 2015/02/16 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 ½ – ½ GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 ½ – ½ GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 6
9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 ½ – ½ GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 5
10 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 0 – 1 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 4
11 GM Giri Anish 2797 ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 3
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Svidler Peter 2739 2
Round 3 on 2015/02/17 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 ½ – ½ GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 1
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 ½ – ½ GM Giri Anish 2797 11
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 0 – 1 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 1 – 0 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 0 – 1 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
Round 4 on 2015/02/18 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 ½ – ½ GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 1 – 0 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
10 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 0 – 1 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 6
11 GM Giri Anish 2797 ½ – ½ GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 5
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 4
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 3
Round 5 on 2015/02/20 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 1 – 0 GM Svidler Peter 2739 2
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 0 – 1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 1
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 ½ – ½ GM Giri Anish 2797 11
7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 1 – 0 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 ½ – ½ GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
Round 6 on 2015/02/21 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 1 – 0 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
10 GM Mamedyarov is propecia sold over the counter Shakhriyar 2759 ½ – ½ GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
11 GM Giri Anish 2797 ½ – ½ GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 6
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 1 – 0 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 5
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 ½ – ½ GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 4
Round 7 on 2015/02/22 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 3
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 ½ – ½ GM Svidler Peter 2739 2
7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 1 – 0 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 1
8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 1 – 0 GM Giri Anish 2797 11
9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 0 – 1 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
Round 8 on 2015/02/23 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 ½ – ½ GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
11 GM Giri Anish 2797 ½ – ½ GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 0 – 1 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 0 – 1 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 6
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 ½ – ½ GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 5
Round 9 on 2015/02/25 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 1 – 0 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 4
7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 0 – 1 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 3
8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 ½ – ½ GM Svidler Peter 2739 2
9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 ½ – ½ GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 1
10 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 ½ – ½ GM Giri Anish 2797 11
Round 10 on 2015/02/26 at 15-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
12 GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 ½ – ½ GM Giri Anish 2797 11
1 GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 ½ – ½ GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 10
2 GM Svidler Peter 2739 ½ – ½ GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 9
3 GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 ½ – ½ GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 8
4 GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 ½ – ½ GM Jobava Baadur 2696 7
5 GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 ½ side effects of plavix – ½ GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 6
Round 11 on 2015/02/27 at 13-00
SNo. Name Rtg Res. Name Rtg SNo.
6 GM Tomashevsky Evgeny 2716 ½ – ½ GM Radjabov Teimour 2731 12
7 GM Jobava Baadur 2696 ½ – ½ GM Andreikin Dmitry 2737 5
8 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 ½ – ½ GM Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2705 4
9 GM Grischuk Alexander 2810 ½ – ½ GM Vachier-Lagrave Maxime 2775 3
10 GM Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2759 ½ – ½ GM Svidler Peter 2739 2
11 GM Giri Anish 2797 ½ – ½ GM Dominguez Perez Leinier 2726 1

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Find pictures, videos, and game sheets along with further information on the official tournament website http://tbilisi2015.fide.com/.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe