Chess Jargon for Beginners

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Relatively often, beginners and people interested in chess are scared away by complicated terms and do not dare diving deeper into the topic.

Having only just learned how to move the figures on the board and facing a more experienced player, who then asks you why you haven’t castled yet, advises you not to use the Isolani strategy, or tells you that you should have used your Pawn advantage to create a free Pawn in order to avoid the minority-driven attack, can be frustrating.

Shoptalk, after all, is just as big of a part of chess as strategic thinking and the poker face is. Beginners, however, tend to get the impression that the complexity of chess is tied to serious time commitment to only learn the basics.

Today, Chessimo shows you that the professional terms aren’t so difficult at all and gives you an overview of the fundamental vocabulary. Behind the big expressions are usually simple positions and move sequences. Get yourself a cup of coffee in a fifteen-minute break, lean back and look forward to wearing the smarty-pants during the next game of chess!

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The Opening Game

The “Opening” is the very beginning of a game and that part of the duel that emphasizes the phase of piece development and taking the chance of castling as early as possible. The opening stage is over when one or both players’ Rooks are connected. The player who finishes the development phase first takes initiative. Opening variations are defined as three different playing styles:

  • The Open Game

Begins with the sequence 1. e4 e5

Risky variation – every mistake leads to loss

Example: Italian, Spanish

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  • Semi-Open Game

Begins with 1. e4, Black continues with any move other than e5

Calm variation

Example: Sicilian, French

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  • Closed Game

Begins with anything but 1. e4

Few tactical opening elements, played with few losses

Example: Queen’s Gambit, Larsen-System

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Castling

Castling serves two primary functions simultaneously: it puts the King in a protected position behind an own Pawn and offers the opportunity to develop a Rook that can easily occupy an open or semi-open line. If both of the following mandatory preconditions are met, the King and Rook can move at the same time:

  • Neither of the two figures have been moved in the game
  • The King is not in check
  • The squares that the King must pass are not in check
  • The King is not in check after castling
  • The squares between the King and Rook are not occupied by other pieces

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If these conditions are met, the King can move two squares towards the Rook. The Rook may then move past the King to its neighboring square. Chess professionals distinguish between short and long castling (depending on whether the King is moved towards the left-hand or right-hand Rook). Short castling is safer than long castling, as it can be performed in shorter time (one only has to move two figures in between the King and Rook). In addition, the King stays in further distance to the board’s center and therefore in a safer position behind an own Pawn.

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En Passant

If a first move is made with a Pawn two fields forward, one has to account for a few particularities. If it moves past the offence line of an opposite Pawn (and is then located right next to it), this exact opposite Pawn is allowed to capture yours immediately after your move (and only then). Capturing en passant must always be carried out right away.

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The Center

The center of the chess board is made up of the following squares: e4, e5, d4, and d5. The so-called big center is that square in between the cornering fields c3, c6, f3, and f6. The opening’s objective to obtain the advantage of space. Who is in space advantage, claims more mobility for his pieces (while the Knight controls eight squares in the center, a corner piece can only move onto one of two squares) and is therefore flexible in positioning his figures on one wing or the other.

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Structure of Pawns

Isolani – Pawns without another back-up Pawn in the same color on a neighboring line. Therefore, they can only be covered by pieces other than Pawns if attacked. The crucial weakness of an Isolani is the fact that the square right in front of it is weak, as it cannot be controlled by another Pawn and is therefore easily taken over by the opposite color.

Backward Pawn – Pawns behind the line of their neighboring Pawns that cannot move forward, because an opposite Pawn holds control of that square. Usually, a Backward Pawn disrupts the line of defending pieces. In addition, the square in front of it can be preoccupied by a piece of the opposite color.

Double Pawns – Pawns of the same color in positions on the same line. Double Pawns are less flexible in movement than common Pawns and more vulnerable to attacks of the opposite side, especially when they are Isolani too. Nevertheless, Double Pawns don’t necessarily have to be a disadvantage: at times, they can compensate by holding control of an open or semi-open Line or of the center.

Hanging Pawns – Pawns on lines with no Pawns of the same color neighboring them. When positioned in a line, they can control several squares in front of them which is an advantage, but they cannot be defended by other Pawns. If one of them moves forwards, a backward Pawn and a weak square occur which can be taken advantage of by the opponent.

Passed Pawn – Pawn with no opposite Pawns in the way. On the line they are part of as well as of neighboring lines. A Passed Pawn is considered a harmful weapon, as it can quickly reach the eighth line and be promoted (see “Promotion”).

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Promotion

If a Pawn reaches the opposite base line it must immediately (within the same move) be promoted to a Bishop, Knight, Rook, or Queen.

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Minority Attack

If a player holds a Pawn Majority on either side of the board, the opponent can initiate a minority attack on the opposite side. Such attack means moving the Pawns forward for capturing. The opponent will then be left with only one Pawn or a Backward Pawn.

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Fianchetto

If a Bishop is placed at the edge of the own piece positioning, in a cave of the Pawn Structure on one of the two main diagonals of the board, professionals speak of a “Fianchetto”. Sounds complicated, but isn’t complicated at all in practice. Go ahead and google a few pictures, that’ll help you understand J

This positioning of the Bishop is very effective and therefore very popular in a number of opening strategies in chess. The Fianchetto move is in fact an opening move, like the King’s Fianchetto, but can also be applied in mid-game.

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“Zugzwang” – German for a situation in chess with compulsion to move

Zugzwang is a situation in which the positioning after every possible move will be worse than before or if no move had been made at all. Pushing the opponent toward Zugzwang is particularly important in the end-game of Bishop against Knight. The Bishop is in serious advantage, as it can make moves within a waiting position, as it practically controls all the same fields if it makes a diagonal move. The Knight, on the other hand, loses control of the previous fields after every move.

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Opposition

Kings are in Opposition, if they face each other on the same line, row, or diagonal only one square away from each other. Opposition is a derivative of Zugzwang: the King obliged to move lets the other Kind invade his own position.

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Stalemate

If the player who is up for the next turn cannot make another move and the King is not in check, the duels ends in a draw. Professionals refer to this situation as a Stalemate, which is rated like a draw.

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Draw

A duel ends in a draw (tie game = 0.5 points),

  • If the draw was negotiated consensually
  • If a Stalemate occurs (see above)
  • If even every possible series of moves lead to a win or loss
  • If a positioning has appeared for the third time and the same player is up for a move
  • If for fifty moves without movement of any Pawns or capture
  • If a clock of either of the players has run out, but the duel cannot be won by own means (not through no legal series of moves, in accordance with FIDE paragraph 6.10).

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Did you now begin to see? If you feel like spending more time with the theory of chess, have a look at our 101 Chess Tips!

Do you know any other professional terms that you need a simple explanation for? Leave a comment or send us a message!

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Nakamura Wins Zurich Chess Challenge 2015

Zurich Chess Challenge 2015

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The legendary Zurich Chess Challenge took place from February 13 to 19, 2015 at the “Savoy Baur en Ville” in the Swiss city Zurich. Title defender Magnus Carlsen did not show up this year, but the world-class competitors certainly made up for it. The six participants were:

Winner of the overall rating Hikaru Nakamura who persistently fought for the title and stood strong through the Armageddon tiebreak against Anand.

Runner-up and former World Champion Visvanathan Anand who won the Classical with seven points.

Russian talent Vladimir Kramnik, who won the Rapid competition, but only made it to 3rd rank in total standings.

Levon Aronian, who had to comply with 4th rank and the victory of the Blitz competition.

25 year-old Sergey Karjakin, who currently ranks 12th in worldwide standings, but only ranked 5th in Zurich.

Italian player Fabiano Caruana, runner-up in world rankings, who surprisingly and disappointingly ended up in bottom rank.

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Final Ranking
Rank Name NAT Points ELO
1 Hikaru Nakamura USA 9 2776
2 Viswanathan Anand IND 9 2797
3 Vladimir Kramnik RUS 8.5 2783
4 Levon Aronian ARM 7 2777
5 Sergey Karjakin RUS 6 2760
6 Fabiano Caruana ITA 5.5 2811

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Parings & Final Results Classical
Round 1 – Sat, February 14th
Anand, Viswanathan
1:1
Kramnik, Vladimir
Aronian, Levon
1:1
Karjakin, Sergey
Caruana, Fabiano
0:2
Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 2 – Sun, February 15th
Kramnik, Vladimir
1:1
Nakamura, Hikaru
Karjakin, Sergey
1:1
Caruana, Fabiano
Anand, Viswanathan
2:0
Aronian, Levon
Round 3 – Mon, February 16th
Aronian, Levon
1:1
Kramnik, Vladimir
Caruana, Fabiano
1:1
Anand, Viswanathan
Nakamura, Hikaru
2:0
Karjakin, Sergey
Round 4 – Tue, February 17th
Kramnik, Vladimir
1:1
Karjakin, Sergey
Anand, Viswanathan
2:0
Nakamura, Hikaru
Aronian, Levon
1:1
Caruana, Fabiano
Round 5 – Wed, February 18th
Caruana, Fabiano
1:1
Kramnik, Vladimir
Nakamura, Hikaru
1:1
Aronian, Levon
Karjakin, Sergey
1:1
Anand, Viswanathan

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Rank Name NAT Points ELO
1 Viswanathan Anand IND 7 2797
2 Hikaru Nakamura USA 6 2776
3 Vladimir Kramnik RUS 5 2783
4 Sergey Karjakin RUS 4 2760
5 Fabiano Caruana ITA 4 2811
6 Levon Aronian ARM 4 2777

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Pairings & Final Result Rapid
Round 1 – Thu, February 19th
Kramnik, Vladimir
½:½
Anand, Viswanathan
Karjakin, Sergey
0:1
Aronian, Levon
Nakamura, Hikaru
1:0
Caruana, Fabiano
Round 2 – Thu, February 19th
Nakamura, Hikaru
0:1
Kramnik, Vladimir
Caruana, Fabiano
1:0
Karjakin, Sergey
Aronian, Levon
1:0
Anand, Viswanathan
Round 3 – Thu, February 19th
Kramnik, Vladimir
1:0
Aronian, Levon
Anand, Viswanathan
1:0
Caruana, Fabiano
Karjakin, Sergey
½:½
Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 4 – Thu, February 19th
Karjakin, Sergey
1:0
Kramnik, Vladimir
Nakamura, Hikaru
1:0
Anand, Viswanathan
Caruana, Fabiano
½:½
Aronian, Levon
Round 5 – Thu, February 19th
Kramnik, Vladimir
1:0
Caruana, Fabiano
Anand, Viswanathan
½:½
Karjakin, Sergey
Aronian, Levon
½:½
Nakamura, Hikaru

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Rank Name NAT Points ELO
1 Vladimir Kramnik RUS 3.5 2783
2 Levon Aronian ARM 3 2777
3 Hikaru Nakamura USA 3 2776
4 Sergey Karjakin RUS 2 2760
5 Viswanathan Anand IND 2 2797
6 Fabiano Caruana ITA 1.5 2811

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Pairings & Final Results Blitz
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Round 1 – Fr, February 13th
Karjakin, Sergey
0:1
Anand, Viswanathan
Caruana, Fabiano
½:½
Nakamura, Hikaru
Aronian, Levon
½:½
Kramnik, Vladimir
Round 2 – Fr, February 13th
Nakamura, Hikaru
0:1
Aronian, Levon
Anand, Viswanathan
1:0
Kramnik, Vladimir
Karjakin, Sergey
0:1
Caruana, Fabiano
Round 3 – Fr, February 13th
Aronian, Levon
1:0
Karjakin, Sergey
Caruana, Fabiano
½:½
Anand, Viswanathan
Kramnik, Vladimir
½:½
Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 4 – Fr, February 13th
Karjakin, Sergey
1:0
Kramnik, Vladimir
Caruana, Fabiano
½:½
Aronian, Levon
Anand, Viswanathan
1:0
Nakamura, Hikaru
Round 5 – Fr, February 13th
Aronian, Levon
1:0
Anand, Viswanathan
Kramnik, Vladimir
0:1
Caruana, Fabiano
Nakamura, Hikaru
1:0
Karjakin, Sergey

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Rank Name NAT Points ELO
1 Levon Aronian ARM 4 2777
2 Fabiano Caruana ITA 3.5 2811
3 Viswanathan Anand IND 3.5 2797
4 Hikaru Nakamura USA 2 2776
5 Vladimir Kramnik RUS 1 2783
6 Sergey Karjakin RUS 1 2760

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Find pictures, videos, and game sheets on the official tournament website:

http://www.zurich-cc.com/

written by Sarah, translated Birthe

How Much Money Do Chess Professionals Make?

Money

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Many enthusiastic chess players wonder at some point in their career whether or not they can make a living from their hobby. This thought of earning money through passionately playing on the board tempts many.

Today, we report about different ways for chess players to earn money.

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Significant Amounts of Prize Money for Top-Professionals

It is no surprise at all that Magnus Carlsen should have it together financially. For only the last two World Championship titles he took home over two million US Dollars ($900,000 in 2014 and $1,500,000 in 2013. The runner-ups are rewarded with not much less than that – Visvanathan Anand still made $600,000 in 2014 and $900,000 in 2013 when losing the World Championship duels.

To qualify as Magnus Carlsen’s challenger chess players have to prove themselves through a set of hurdles: For starters, one must win the FIDE Grand Prix. Four Grand Prix tournaments are being held for the upcoming World Championship. Each of the sixteen participants must compete in three out of four events. The prize money fund for each tournament amounts to €120,000, €20,000 of which go to the victor. The right to participate in these tournaments is reserved exclusively for the world-class players, who make quite a salary with their performances. Within the last few weeks, Hikaru Nakamura won £20,000 at the Tradewise Gibraltar Open, Yanyi Yu was rewarded with $25,000 at the Qatar Masters Open, while Vladimir Kramnik and Anish Giri received $15,000 and $10,000 at the same event. Nevertheless, most of the top-class players don’t make a fortune with only participating in chess tournaments. Fabiano Caruana, number 2 in worldwide standings (right behind Magnus Carlsen) participated in a number of tournaments during the last twelve months: Grenke Chess Classic (4th), London Chess Classic (6th), Grand Prix (7th), Sinquefield Cup (1st, $100,000 prize money), Torneio Agosto (3rd), World Championship in Blitz Chess (36th) and Rapid Chess (2nd, $24,000), as well as the Zurich Chess Challenge (2nd). Participating in chess tournaments he made an average monthly salary of $10,000, in which the victory at the Sinquefield Cup weighs heavily.

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Open Tournaments as a Source of Income?

The world’s Top 20 does not only profit from prize money. Most tournament organizers decorate themselves with prestigious names and offer the professional players free participation, board & lodging. Many chess players in their early careers can only dream of such invitation. Along with travelling expenses, they usually pay high entry fees and board & lodging from their own pocket. Prize funds, if even existent, barely cover the incurred costs. The victor of the recent Amateur Chess Championship, with participants of ELO-ratings under 2,000 points, on the Greek island Evia won €1,000 prize money. Chess enthusiasts who have not made it to the “who-is-who” of chess yet may categorize this sport an expensive hobby rather than as a lucrative additional income. Competition is fierce at open tournaments, winning chances are low, and the risks of only becoming richer in experience are high.

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Alternative: Team Membership

To achieve a reliable extra income most professionals have no other option than joining a team (or many teams) in league games. Regardless of the game results players are paid for tournament participation. The salaries vary between clubs and professional level and amount to €150 to €500. The goal of most players is to participate in as many league games as possible – and they enjoy a very special privilege in this sport. In chess, players have the right to represent several different countries at a time. Only at the European Chess Club Cup players have to decide which country they would like to represent at the tournament. However, only the best of the best have this difficult decision to make.

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Having More Than One Career Pillar

Government support for chess is very limited in some countries (in Germany’s case chess was almost completely cut off), so that many players do not have the opportunity to focus on their chess career. Many young talents are forced to reduce their passion to a spare-time activity – next to high school, college, or job training. Below an ELO-rating of 2650 points it is close to impossible to earn more with chess than is invested in it. This is in distinct contrary to countries like China, Russia, or India where chess prodigies have all kinds of possibilities to receive intensive coaching.

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Expertise as an Additional Source of Income

As many countries don’t offer their chess talents sufficient sources of income in league membership and/or tournament participation, ‘All-rounders’ have better chances to make a living from their passion for chess. Enthusiasm for the sport can be profitable in neighboring businesses as well – Professionals pass on their expertise as coaches and built a second pillar in their pay-roll. There is always an option of publicizing books, eBooks, specialists’ articles, newspaper columns, blogs, instructional videos, and online comments to make additional income. Whoever has solid expertise and good game performance but isn’t exactly a prodigy must be creative today and always keep an eye open for innovative ideas and engagements. Undoubtedly, it is a time-consuming business to make money with chess.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Grenke Chess Classics 2015: Naiditsch got Carlsen into a sweat!

Grenke Chess ClassicsOnce again, Germany was stage to a world-class tournament! From February 2 to 9 2015, Baden-Baden hosted the Grenke Chess Classic 2015.

The constellation of participants couldn’t have been any more promising:

First of all, the Norwegian World Champion and “Mozart of Chess” Magnus Carlsen with the highest ELO-rating ever recorded in history, 2862 points. For six years, the Germans had been excited to see him play in their country, and it was definitely worth the wait. Carlsen impressed with his performance – 4.5 out of 7 points after the final round and a thrilling tiebreak with the German Grandmaster Arkadij Naiditsch.

After two rounds of each ten minutes plus two seconds per move and two victories of White, another two rounds were necessary to determine the final winner. These additional two rounds lasted only five minutes each plus two seconds per move. Carlsen began the 3rd tiebreak round with the White pieces, but couldn’t avoid another draw. The 4th tiebreak round seemed auspicious for Naiditsch, but nevertheless ended in a draw. The last and decisive round was finally played with six minutes for White and five minutes for Black plus each two seconds per move. Carlsen (playing White) was obviously in advantage and after the highest possible level of suspense, after 32 moves, and at 11.50 p.m. German time the duel ended in Carlson’s favor.

Secondly, the current runner-up in the world rankings (ELO 2820), Fabiano Caruana, was eagerly expected to show at the event. He of all people had the potential to challenge Magnus Carlsen. The Italian is considered a serious favorite for the upcoming World Championship. The 22 year-old won an incredible seven matches in a row at the Sinquefield Cup 2014 and finally won with 8.5 out of 10 points (a total of three points ahead of Carlsen!). His ELO-performance of 3103 is certainly a world record! At the Grenke Chess Classics 2015, he scored 4 out of 7 points and ranked 4th. During the entire tournament he remained undefeated and scored a victory against Aronian.

Thirdly, the Indian Grandmaster Visvanathan Anand (ELO 2797) who is not only the current number five in world rankings, but also title defender at the Grenke Chess Classics. The 45 year-old former World Champion had a great comeback last year when winning the Candidates Tournament in Chanty Mansijsk and qualifying as Magnus Carlsen’s World Championship opponent. Since the devastating defeat at the World Championship duel last November the event in Baden-Baden was his first meet with his biggest opponent Carlsen. After a relatively good start (first three rounds with draws), Vishy had to admit defeat to the World Champion yet again and lost to Aronian in the following round. In the end, he scored only 2.5 out of 7 points, due to another defeat through Adams, and ended up in a disappointing 7th rank.

Fourthly, Levon Aronian with 2797 ELO points and 6th rank in worldwide standings has not fallen behind. The Armenian superstar is multiple World Champion in Blitz Chess and Chess960 and is cherished at home like no other. In May 2012, Levon Aronian was second best player in FIDE world rankings at 2825 ELO points and third best player in history. Recently, his performance has weakened a little, but at the Grenke Chess Classics 2015 he was certainly back in shape: He played draws in five out of seven duels, scored one victory against Vishy Anand, and suffered one defeat against Fabiano Caruana (which is definitely not a shame). With 3.5 points and 5th rank he couldn’t continue his top performance, but left Baden-Baden with a solid impression.

Fifthly, 43 year-old Michal Adams with an ELO-rating of 2738 points who is currently number 17 in world rankings. The Briton was already participant of the 2013 edition of the Grenke Chess Classics and placed 4th. Germany seemed to have brought him luck in the past – he won the Sparkassen Chess Meeting in Dortmund ahead of Vladimir Kramnik. At the Grenke Chess Classics 2015 he scored 4 points and ranked 3rd, ahead of Caruana, Aronian, and Anand. Good job!

Sixthly, Grandmaster Etienne Bacrot who was announced youngest Grandmaster of all time at the early age of fourteen. The seven times French Champion had a powerful start into a promising chess career, but couldn’t keep up with the pace in the long run. Today, the 31 year-old Frenchman holds an ELO of 2711 points and ranks in the Top 50 of the world rankings. Compared to Carlsen, Caruana, Anand, Aronian, and Adams he is far behind on his 36th rank. At the Grenke Chess Classics 2015, he played all seven rounds in draws and ranked 6th in the end. Not quite a surprise.

Seventhly, Arkadij Naiditsch who seriously knows how to cause a stir. The 29 year-old German started at the tournament as rank 38 in worldwide standings and an ELO-rating of 2694. Naiditsch became Germany’s youngest Grandmaster at 15 years old. Highlights of his career were the victory at the Dortmund Chess Days 2005 (over Vladimir Kramnik, Peter Leko, and Michael Adams) and the victory over Magnus Carlsen in 2014 at the Chess Olympics in Tromsö (as a member of the German national team). That this achievement wasn’t pure luck, became obvious when he repeated his incredible performance in round 3 of the Grenke Chess Classics 2015 and beat the World Champion yet again! In round 4 he prevailed over Baramidze and managed to get through the tournament with top-opponents without a single defeat! This extraordinary performance caused him to be equal in points with Carlsen after round 7. What followed was a nerve-wrecking playoff in 5 rounds that seriously got Carlsen into a sweat – unfortunately unsuccessfully. He had to comply with 2nd rank of which he can be very proud.

Eighthly, and lastly, the youngest German national player David Baramidze. The 26 year-old was bottom rank in both start and end rakings with an ELO of 2594 points (number 237 in world rankings). From the very beginning, he was hopelessly inferior. At the Grenke Chess Classics 2014, he ranked second behind Arkadij Naiditsch and thus qualified for this year’s event. Baramidze started off as underdog in Baden-Baden and would have loved to cause one or another surprise, but with his top-class opponents he stood no chance. After two draws a sequence of unfortunate defeats began: Baramidze lost to Adams, Naiditsch, Carlsen, Anand, and Caruana. With 1.5 points he ended up in bottom rank.

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Pairings and Results

1st Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

1

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

½ – ½

GM

Anand, Viswanathan

2797

8

2

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

½ – ½

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

7

3

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

½ – ½

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

6

4

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

½ – ½

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

5

2nd Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

8

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

½ – ½

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

5

6

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

1 – 0

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

4

7

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

½ – ½

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

3

1

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

½ – ½

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

2

3rd Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

2

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

½ – ½

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

8

3

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

0 – 1

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

1

4

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

1 – 0

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

7

5

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

1 – 0

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

6

4th Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

8

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

0 – 1

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

6

7

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

0 – 1

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

5

1

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

½ – ½

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

4

2

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

½ – ½

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

3

5th Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

3

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

1 – 0

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

8

4

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

½ – ½

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

2

5

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

½ – ½

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

1

6

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

1 – 0

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

7

6th Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

8

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

1 – 0

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

7

1

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

½ – ½

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

6

2

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

½ – ½

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

5

3

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

½ – ½

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

4

7th Round

No.

 

Name

ELO

Score

 

Name

ELO

No.

4

GM

Adams, Michael

2738

1 – 0

GM

Anand, Visvanathan

2797

8

5

GM

Naiditsch, Arkadij

2706

½ – ½

GM

Aronian, Levon

2777

3

6

GM

Carlsen, Magnus

2865

½ – ½

GM

Bacrot, Etienne

2711

2

7

GM

Baramidze, David

2594

½ – ½

GM

Caruana, Fabiano

2811

1

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Final Rankings after 7 Rounds
Rank Name ELO RED Points Victory Black Victory
1 GM Carlsen Magnus 2865 NOR 3 1
2 GM Naiditsch Arkadij 2706 GER 2 1
3 GM Adams Michael 2738 ENG 4 2 0
4 GM Caruana Fabiano 2811 ITA 4 1 1
5 GM Aronian Levon 2777 ARM 1 0
6 GM Bacrot Etienne 2711 FRA 0 0
7 GM Anand Viswanathan 2797 IND 1 0
8 GM Baramidze David 2594 GER 0 0

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written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

Hikaru Nakamura Scores at Tradewise Gibraltar Masters

Gibraltar Masters 2015

From January 25 to February 2 2015 the Caleta Hotel in Gibraltar hosted the Tradewise Gibraltar Masters. Amongst other rewards, the winner could expect 20,000 British Pounds prize money, while the second and third rank still won 16,000 and 12,000 British Pounds.

This outlook lured 257 participants from 46 countries to the event. Germany was the best represented country with 30 players, followed by England (23) and Spain (19). As there were no qualification requirements, many newcomers took the chance and competed against well-known Grandmasters like Veselin Topalov, Hikaru Nakamura, Peter Svidler, Nikita Vitiugov, Dmitry Jakovenko, Pentala Harikrishna, Yangyi Yu, and Yifan Hou. The results were final after 10th round.

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Final Top 20 Rankings
Rank   Name Rating Country Points  TB1
1 GM Nakamura Hikaru 2776 USA 8.5 2919
2 GM Howell David W L 2670 ENG 8.0 2818
3 GM Hou Yifan 2673 CHN 7.5 2772
4 GM Vitiugov Nikita 2735 RUS 7.5 2770
5 GM Topalov Veselin 2800 BUL 7.5 2767
6 IM Wagner Dennis 2501 GER 7.5 2759
7 GM Wei Yi 2675 CHN 7.5 2754
8 GM Adhiban B. 2630 IND 7.5 2750
9 GM Harikrishna P. 2723 IND 7.5 2748
10 GM Bachmann Axel 2629 PAR 7.5 2722
11 GM Matlakov Maxim 2695 RUS 7.5 2667
12 GM Svidler Peter 2739 RUS 7.0 2719
13 GM Yu Yangyi 2724 CHN 7.0 2707
14 GM Jakovenko Dmitry 2733 RUS 7.0 2700
15 GM Naroditsky Daniel 2622 USA 7.0 2698
16 GM Rapport Richard 2716 HUN 7.0 2677
17 GM Nabaty Tamir 2579 ISR 7.0 2615
18 GM Sutovsky Emil 2637 ISR 7.0 2605
19 GM Bok Benjamin 2572 NED 7.0 2582
20 GM Sengupta Deep 2569 IND 7.0 2574

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As can be seen in the ranking, Russia was represented four times in the Top 20 (Vitiugov, Matlakov, Svidler, Jakovenko) – best performance of all participating nations.

Victor Hikaru Nakamura was able to win the first six rounds in a row and remained undefeated with another three draws (Round 7 against runner-up David Howell, Round 9 against Bachmann, Round 10 against Harikrishna).

The remarkable performances of 25 year-old Axel Bachmann (8th rank, Paraguay, seated 22nd), runner-up David Howell (seated 15th), and 18 year-old German Dennis Wagner (rank 8, seated 65th) were great surprises.

Find videos and detailed match reports on the official Tournament Website:

http://www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe