Karpov: „Anand and Kramnik never really stood up to their responsibility of leading the world of chess”

Sergey Korzun, chief editor of the Russian radio channel Echo Moskvij had the honors of interviewing former World Champion Anatoly Karpov (1975 to 1985 and 1993 to 1999) for one whole hour. Whilst interviewing he worded a few opinions that probably bother not only sympathizers of Vishy Anand and Vladimir Kramnik.

Karpov

He praised Magnus Carlsen’s memory and individual playing style, but criticized his “inflexible” opening repertoire and expressed doubt about his byname ‘exceptional talent’. In Karpov’s opinion Fischer and he himself were much stronger then Magnus Carlsen is today. However, he emphasized that Carlsen has growth potential and leaves the thought whether he will ever reach the level of Bobby Fischer and himself unanswered. He does expect great things from Carlsen though.

Karpov mentioned having played against Carlsen many times, but cleverly skipped the fact that Carlsen defeated him at the age of 13.

Karpov is amazed, on the other hand, by Carlsen’s representing role as Chess World Champion and how, symbolically, he has become the leader in the world of chess. In this context he referred to the Norwegian talent’s predecessors Visvanathan Anand and Vladimir Kramnik as selfish figures. He thinks of them as money-oriented chess players who tried to only protect their titles through preparation. They are to be held responsible for missed opportunities and decreasing recognition of chess as a sport.

In his opinion, the challenge Anand is facing with the upcoming World Championship duel against Carlsen is “stunning”. After the last fight at which Anand had lost his title, Karpov would have never expected for him to return to competition. Karpov called Anand’s playing style against Carlsen “poor and helpless” and even guessed that he has developed a kind of “Carlsen Complex”. He did acknowledge Vishy’s outstanding performance at the World Championship qualifications, which he considers fruits of his hard preparation efforts.

Lastly, Karpov sharply criticized the value that the FIDE is giving the ELO-ratings. Such ratings as qualification criteria for tournaments are a ‘crime against check’. During his time as Chess World Champion He discussed the ELO-issue with the inventor of the rating system, Professor Arpad Elo. Elo himself had only invented the system as approximate measure, and had not intended for it to be an absolute criteria for decision-making. The ELO-rating should be a rough measure of the objective capability in matters of chess. Accepting or rejecting players on the basis of ELO points when it comes to tournaments is a severe mistake, as differences in this measure do not indicate who might be the better chess player overall.

Furthermore, Karpov recognized an inflation in ELO-ratings. When he became World Champion, top ELOs ranged around 2600 and 2700, whilst today an ELO is 2650 is not even enough to be listed amongst the Top 100 players of this world. Not only higher ratings but also the shrinking difference between players is target of his criticism. At the zenith of his career, Fischer was 100 points ahead of his runner-up, and Karpov’s ELO account exceeded his strongest opponent’s by 50 points.

On November 7, the World Championship battle between Magnus Carlsen and Visvanathan Anand will begin in Sochi. We are curiously waiting for further opinions of expert observers.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

World Junior Chess Championship (U20)

The greatest chess junior talents showed their abilities at the city of Pune in India from October 5 to 20. At temperatures of almost 90 degrees Fahrenheit the World Junior Chess Championship was carried out.

World Junior Chess Championship137 young men from 46 nations competed against each other. More than half of the competitors originated from India (74 players), which left the remaining nations represented by only one, sometimes two, or even three players only. The Netherlands were actually the second best represented country with four competitors. The disappointment for India must have been harsh: the first three ranks were taken by Chinese and Russian players. In fact, only four Indian players ranked amongst the Top 20.

 

Top 20. Final Ranking Men

Rank

  Name FED

Score

1

GM Lu Shanglei CHN

10

2

GM Wei Yi CHN

9,5

3

GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS

9,5

4

GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL

9,5

5

GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND

9

6

GM Dragun Kamil POL

9

7

IM Narayanan Srinath IND

9

8

IM Karthikeyan Murali IND

9

9

IM Ghosh Diptayan IND

8,5

10

IM Bai Jinshi CHN

8,5

11

GM Bok Benjamin NED

8,5

12

IM Kriebel Tadeas CZE

8,5

13

GM Van Kampen Robin NED

8,5

14

GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE

8,5

15

FM Csonka Balazs HUN

8,5

16

GM Cori Jorge PER

8

17

GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM

8

18

IM Tari Aryan NOR

8

19

GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS

8

20

GM Kovalev Vladislav BLR

8

 

Nineteen year-old Shanglei Lu has qualified for participating in the World Cup 2016, a tournament scheduled in the context of the World Championship cycle 2015-2017. The battle for first rank remained tense until the very end; only in round 13, Lu was able to secure the tournament victory.

We also expecting great successes from silver medalist Yi Wei in the future – the fifteen year-old already holds an ELO-rating of 2641 points.

The girls’ tournament was staffed with 78 players from 29 nations, 36 players of which originated from India. Despite the fact that India was again best-represented nation in this competition, only three participants ranked amongst the Top 20. The best of all Indians, like in the boys’ category, ranked 5th.

 Top 20 Final Ranking Women

Rank

  Name FED

Score

1

WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS

11

2

WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI

9,5

3

WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER

9,5

4

WGM Padmini Rout IND

9

5

WIM Zhai Mo CHN

8,5

6

WIM Iwanow Anna POL

8,5

7

WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE

8,5

8

IM Arabidze Meri GEO

8,5

9

WIM Kurbonboeva Sarvinoz UZB

8,5

10

WFM Srija Seshadri IND

8

11

WFM Gevorgyan Maria ARM

8

12

FM Brunello Marina ITA

8

13

  Gelip Ioana ROU

8

14

WIM Fronda Jan Jodilyn PHI

8

15

WIM Ni Shiqun CHN

8

16

FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS

7,5

17

WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND

7,5

18

WIM Gu Tianlu CHN

7,5

19

WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI

7,5

20

WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS

7,5

 

Aleksandra Goryachkina (holding the highest ELO-rating in her category at 2430 points) secured gold with a top performance of 11 out of 13 points and was far ahead off the silver and bronze medalists. This victory is the sixteen year-old’s second Junior World Championship title and qualifies her for participation in the World Championship tournament of women in 2015.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

 

 

 

Two Victors at the FIDE Grand Prix in Baku

Baku Grand Prix

The first tournament of the new FIDE Grand Prix Series was scheduled to run from October 1 to 15 in Baku, Azerbaijan. The World Championship series of 2014/15 consists of four tournaments, which is rather extraordinary, as until now a full cycle always has always been made up of six tournaments. The FIDE remains silent and names no reasons for this significant chance. People are speculating, though, that there weren’t enough applicants willing to host the events.

The total prize fund for each tournament holds 120,000 EUR, of which the victor receives 20,000 EUR. Both winner and runner-up are also granted the right to participate in the Candidates’ Tournament.

The tournament in Baku was staffed with twelve top-class super-grandmasters with ELOs of 2700 and above: Dominguez Perez, Tomashevsky, Karjakin, Gelfand, Nakamura, Mamedyarov, Radjabov, Svidler, Andreikin, Caruana, Grischuk, and Kasimdzhanov. Fabiano Caruana with starting number 10 had been the top-favorite competitor all along, holding the highest ELO-rating of 2844 points. Despite having the lowest ELO-rating of all participants, Evgeny Tomashesky managed to obtain a terrific 6th rank.

First rank was shared by Fabiano Caruana (4 victories) from Italy and the Israeli Boris Gelfand (3 victories):

FINAL RESULTS

Rank SNo. Name Rtg FED Pts
1 10 Caruana Fabiano 2844 ITA
2 4 Gelfand Boris 2748 ISR
3 3 Karjakin Sergey 2767 RUS 6
4 11 Grischuk Alexander 2797 RUS 6
5 8 Svidler Peter 2732 RUS 6
6 2 Tomashevsky Evgeny 2701 RUS 6
7 5 Nakamura Hikaru 2764 USA 6
8 7 Radjabov Teimour 2726 AZE
9 6 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2764 AZE 5
10 12 Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2706 UZB 5
11 9 Andreikin Dmitry 2722 RUS
12 1 Dominguez Perez Leinier 2751 CUB 3

The ELO-rating may be an indicator for a player’s strength and abilities, but is certainly not the only measure for a player’s performance. This is quite obvious when studying the rounds’ individual results.

Round 1. October 2, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Dominguez Perez Leinier ½ – ½ Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Tomashevsky Evgeny ½ – ½ Grischuk Alexander
Karjakin Sergey 0 – 1 Caruana Fabiano
Gelfand Boris 1 – 0 Andreikin Dmitry
Nakamura Hikaru ½ – ½ Svidler Peter
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar ½ – ½ Radjabov Teimour
Round 2. October 3, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Kasimdzhanov Rustam ½ – ½ Radjabov Teimour
Svidler Peter 1 – 0 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Andreikin Dmitry 0 – 1 Nakamura Hikaru
Caruana Fabiano ½ – ½ Gelfand Boris
Grischuk Alexander ½ – ½ Karjakin Sergey
Dominguez Perez Leinier ½ – ½ Tomashevsky Evgeny
Round 3. October 4, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Tomashevsky Evgeny ½ – ½ Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Karjakin Sergey 1 – 0 Dominguez Perez Leinier
Gelfand Boris 1 – 0 Grischuk Alexander
Nakamura Hikaru ½ – ½ Caruana Fabiano
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar ½ – ½ Andreikin Dmitry
Radjabov Teimour ½ – ½ Svidler Peter
Round 4. October 5, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Kasimdzhanov Rustam ½ – ½ Svidler Peter
Andreikin Dmitry ½ – ½ Radjabov Teimour
Caruana Fabiano 1 – 0 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Grischuk Alexander ½ – ½ Nakamura Hikaru
Dominguez Perez Leinier ½ – ½ Gelfand Boris
Tomashevsky Evgeny ½ – ½ Karjakin Sergey
Round 5. October 7, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Karjakin Sergey ½ – ½ Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Gelfand Boris ½ – ½ Tomashevsky Evgeny
Nakamura Hikaru ½ – ½ Dominguez Perez Leinier
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar ½ – ½ Grischuk Alexander
Radjabov Teimour ½ – ½ Caruana Fabiano
Svidler Peter ½ – ½ Andreikin Dmitry
Round 6. October 8, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 1 – 0 Andreikin Dmitry
Caruana Fabiano 1 – 0 Svidler Peter
Grischuk Alexander 0 – 1 Radjabov Teimour
Dominguez Perez Leinier ½ – ½ Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Tomashevsky Evgeny ½ – ½ Nakamura Hikaru
Karjakin Sergey ½ – ½ Gelfand Boris
Round 7. October 9, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Gelfand Boris ½ – ½ Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Nakamura Hikaru 0 – 1 Karjakin Sergey
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar ½ – ½ Tomashevsky Evgeny
Radjabov Teimour ½ – ½ Dominguez Perez Leinier
Svidler Peter ½ – ½ Grischuk Alexander
Andreikin Dmitry 1 – 0 Caruana Fabiano
Round 8. October 10, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Kasimdzhanov Rustam ½ – ½ Caruana Fabiano
Grischuk Alexander ½ – ½ Andreikin Dmitry
Dominguez Perez Leinier 0 – 1 Svidler Peter
Tomashevsky Evgeny ½ – ½ Radjabov Teimour
Karjakin Sergey ½ – ½ Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Gelfand Boris ½ – ½ Nakamura Hikaru
Round 9. October 12, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Nakamura Hikaru 1 – 0 Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 1 – 0 Gelfand Boris
Radjabov Teimour ½ – ½ Karjakin Sergey
Svidler Peter ½ – ½ Tomashevsky Evgeny
Andreikin Dmitry 1 – 0 Dominguez Perez Leinier
Caruana Fabiano 0 – 1 Grischuk Alexander
Round 10. October 13, 2014. 3 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Kasimdzhanov Rustam 0 – 1 Grischuk Alexander
Dominguez Perez Leinier 0 – 1 Caruana Fabiano
Tomashevsky Evgeny 1 – 0 Andreikin Dmitry
Karjakin Sergey ½ – ½ Svidler Peter
Gelfand Boris 1 – 0 Radjabov Teimour
Nakamura Hikaru ½ – ½ Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Round 11. October 14, 2014. 1 p.m.
Name Res. Name
Mamedyarov Shakhriyar ½ – ½ Kasimdzhanov Rustam
Radjabov Teimour ½ – ½ Nakamura Hikaru
Svidler Peter ½ – ½ Gelfand Boris
Andreikin Dmitry ½ – ½ Karjakin Sergey
Caruana Fabiano ½ – ½ Tomashevsky Evgeny
Grischuk Alexander 1 – 0 Dominguez Perez Leinier

Italian superstar Fabiano Caruana had to comply with defeats in the duels against Dmitry Andreikin (ELO 2722), Alexander Grischuk (ELO 2797), and Leinier Dominguez Perez (ELO 2751) in rounds 7, 9, and 10. Quite a surprise, considering the fact that Andreikin and Dominguez Perez are in last and second-last place in the final rankings.

Sixteen competitors will participate in the Grand Prix Series. In accordance with the rule set, each player can compete in three of the four tournaments. Along with the twelve participants of Baku, chess enthusiasts can look forward to seeing Anish Giri, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Dmitry Jakovenko, and Ehsan Ghaem Maghani in action. The next tournament of the series is scheduled from October 20 to November 3 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe

The Best Chess Variations | Part 3

Chess VariationsYou are looking for changes in playing tactics and are tired of playing only classical chess all the time? Chessimo will introduce you to five interesting variations of classical checkmate. You can easily try them out at home and will still practice all fundamental skills for progress in your classical variations.

In Part 1 we focused on Chess960 / Fischer Random Chess, Casablanca Chess, Andernach-Chess, Nuclear Chess, and Soccer Chess.

Part 2 was dedicated to Maharajah Chess, Crowded Chess, Coin Chess, Robbers’ Chess, and Follow Up Chess.

Today, we have another five variations for you to try out.

1. Knight & Pocket Chess

Regular equipment, usual rule set. Before starting the game, each player takes either one Knight (usually the Queen’s Knight) or both Knights off the boards and puts them in their pocket. At a freely chosen point in time, a player can put the Knight back in the game by taking it out of the pocket and placing it on the board during their turn. This is accounted for as a full move. The Knight is immediately an active chess piece like all other pieces on the board. For the rest of the game, the Knight may be moved according to the classical rules.

2. Turkish Chess

This variation was invented in 1985 and is considered one of the most popular game variations in chess. When playing Turkish Chess, only the Pawns may eliminate the opponent’s pieces. All other pieces are used as usual and may checkmate the other party’s King. Particularly tricky: Once an opposing figure has made it behind the line of Pawns, it cannot be beaten until the end of the game and becomes a major threat. This is about thinking outside the ‘square’.

3. Transformation Chess

A vary suspenseful variation that requires dexterity and thinking ahead. Every time a figure is beaten, the beating figure is immediately transformed: It is replaced by the type of opposing figure it has just beaten, the color of it remains the same. In other words, who beats a Pawn with his Queen has poor chances. Caution: If the King beats another figure, it is not replaced and must still be checkmated. BUT it must continue moving like the figure it just beat.

4. Dice Chess

With the help of dice, chance decides which chess piece is up on the move. King = 6, Queen = 5, Rook = 4, Bishop = 3, Knight = 2, Pawn = 1 (or the other way around – depending on the agreement made in the beginning of the game). Who is in check usually doesn’t have the best chances because the likelihood of rolling the dice in favor of a figure that is able to prevent the King from being checkmated is vanishingly small. If the figure suggested by the dice is in the game anymore or cannot be moved according to the usual rule set, the player has to pass this turn. Pawn promotion is also decided by the dice.

5. Counting Chess

The perfect variation when training prep moves. Both players takes turns. The first player up makes one move, while the one following up makes to moves in a row. After that three moves at one turn and so on. Every time, the move number increases by one which results in very long move sequences. Once check is given, the opponent takes his turn, no matter how many moves would have been left according to the system explained before. Goal as usual. Checkmate.

written by Sarah,translated by Birthe

Happy Birthday, Levon Aronian!

Today’s the birthday of one of the biggest chess grand masters in the world: Levon Aronian!

Levon-Aronian

To this special occasion, we would like to remind you of the highlights and successes of the 32 year-old chess player.

  • 1994. Levon Aronian becomes Youth World Champion U12 in generic plavix Szeged and is therefore rewarded with the FIDE Master title.
  • 1995. Aronian becomes Youth Rapid Chess World Champion U14 in Paris.
  • 1996. He is announced International Master.
  • 1997. Aronian wins the Kasparov Cup, an important Junior Masters Tournament in Moscow.
  • 1998. He decides the European Youth Championship U20 in Yerevan to his favor.
  • 1999. He wins the Armenian National Championship in Yerevan and becomes member of the Armenian National Chess Team, winning the European Team Championship in Batumi.
  • 2000. The FIDE honors him with the Grand Master title.
  • 2002. Levon Aronian becomes Junior World Champion U20 in Panaji, Goa.
  • 2003. He wins the Chess960 Open in Mainz, Germany.
  • 2004. He wins the German Internet Championship.
  • 2005. He competes and prevails at the Russian Team Championship and the European Club Cup as a member of the Russian chess team Tomsk-400.
  • 2005. Aronian wins the Gibraltar Open together with Hikaru Nakamura and Boris Awruch, and the Tournament of Stepanakert (Bergkarabach). At the European Championship in Warsaw he obtains bronze.
  • 2006. He wins the gold medal at the Traditional Tournament of Linares which is one of his most significant successes until today. Aronian is announced World Champion at Chess960 in Mainz and wins the gold at the Chess Olympics in Turin with the Armenian national team.
  • 2007. Levon Aronian shares first rank at the Grand Masters’ Tournament in Wijk aan Zee with Topalov and Radjabov. His victory over Anand at the Tournament of Morelia, Linares is announced Duel of the Year 2007. He prevails over World Champion Vladimir Kramnik at a Rapid Chess Competition in Yerevan and successfully defends his Chess960 World Championship title against Anand at the Mainz Chess Classic.
  • 2008. Aronian and Carlsen win the Corus Tournament in Wijk aan Zee. He also dominates at the Melody Amber Tournament in Nice and wins the gold medal at the Chess Olympics in Dresden, Germany with the Armenian National Team.
  • 2008/09. He wins the second and the fourth tournament of the FIDE Grand Prix Series. After ranking second in the fifth tournament, he secured the overall victory.
  • 2009. Again, he comes off first in overall standings of the Melody Amber Tournament. He vardenafil in pulmonary arterial hypertension a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study wins the Chess Classic Mainz in August and the Grenkeleasing World Championship in Rapid Chess, but loses http://tadalafillevitra-pharmacy.net/ the Chess960 World Championship title to Nakamura. He secures another title at the Grand Slam Finale in Bilbao, even though he only filled in for Vesselin Topalov.
  • 2010. He wins the Blitz Chess World Championship in Moscow.
  • 2011. He competes at the top-board for Armenia at the World Team Championship http://vardenafilcialis-generic.org/ and contributed to the team’s title victory with a result of five points out of eight duels.
  • 2012. He wins the Tata Steel Chess Tournament in Wijk aan Zee and succeeds at the Chess Olympics in Istanbul with the Armenian National Team, where he accomplished the best ELO-rating at the top-rated board.

In May 2012, Levon Aronian is second best chess player of the World, according to FIDE World Rankings, and with an ELO of 2825 points becomes third best player in the history of chess.

  • 2014. He wins the Tata Steel Chess Tournament again and competes in the German National Chess League with the OSG Baden-Baden. They become German Team Champion in 2013 and 2014.

In the recent past, Aronian has been lacking strength. At the Team Chess Olympics in Tromsö, he could not save the Armenian National Team from ranking eighth. He only obtained seven out of eleven points.

At the Sinquefield Cup in September he could again not impress the audience, ranking fifth out of six. At The Masters Final in Bilbao two weeks ago, he was one point short of victor Anand and therefore remained in second place.

Since August, Aronian has been falling behind on the FIDE World Rankings. He started out in second place and is now fifth (behind Carlsen, Caruana, Topalov, and Grischuk), having lost 12 points (Currently 2793).

We are crossing our fingers that he will soon recover from this sudden downswing in performance. At the World Mind Games in Beijing, China (scheduled from December 11 to 17 2014) he has the chance to continue his successful career.

We are also hoping for a strong performance at the Zurich Chess Challenge in February 2015, at which he will compete against Anand, Caruana, Hikamura, Kramni, and Karjakin.

Time will show how wisely he chose his wishes when blowing out vardenafil en farmacias similares the candles on his birthday cake today .. 🙂

written by Sarah, translated by Birthe